** To follow Natasha and Travis on the rest of their journey, please go to nsteinma.wordpress.com

November 24th, 2013

Georgetown, SC

33° 21.934′ N, 79° 17.048′ W

Our next passage, from Tina’s Pocket/Cut, NC to Georgetown, SC, was a calm 22 hours of motoring, drifting (when we realized we had no more fuel reserve – see Clay’s previous post), and sailing. We motored out of the ICW, past Southport, and into the open ocean, which was relatively calm most of the morning. The wind was very minimal for most of the day, and by dusk it had dropped away completely. The water was as placid as I’ve ever seen it… and the sky was eerily beautiful.

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After a long night waiting for the wind, and then tacking back and forth along our rhumb line towards Georgetown, we finally arrived at the Winyah Bay Entrance at flood tide which pulled us into and up through the Winyah Bay to Georgetown. We arrived in some eerie but beautiful fog, and got soaked in a steady drizzle as we set the anchor in the muddy-looking Sampit River. Welcome to Georgetown.

Navigating up Winyah Bay to Georgetown

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As Clay is planning to write more details about the little town of Georgetown, I will suffice it to say that it is a quaint little place, with true southern hospitality and a historic downtown business community that has rallied a positive revitalization of a 7-building string of businesses that were recently burned down in a tragic fire. It has become a central point for the community to focus, rebuild, and grow stronger. What an inspiration!

An artist’s rendition of the storefronts that were lost in the September 2013 fire

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After arriving in Georgetown on the morning of the 23rd and spending some time chatting about our journey thus far and our current positions, we came to the sudden conclusion that we would be parting ways. Clay needs to stay put to gather money for new sails, diesel, and additional food, and doesn’t know how long that will take. Travis and I are determined to make it to the Caribbean and felt that it would be best to try to move onwards. After about two whole days of researching alternatives and reaching out to contacts, Travis found a friend that is planning on leaving from Fort Myers, FL in the next week and a half bound for the USVI. As I needed to get to the Savannah-Hilton Head airport anyway (my mother convinced me to join the family Thanksgiving gathering in Wisconsin for a few days), we made the quick decision to hire a rental car and go inland for the first time in a month to get to Savannah. So, on Monday November 25th, Travis and I packed our awkward square bags back up, and disembarked the beautiful goddess, Sedna, with teary eyes. (But not before I stupidly dropped my wallet into the harbor while climbing into the dinghy… which Travis then dove in after and rescued! It only happened to be the coldest day of the year yet…)IMG_20131125_123048

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Thank you Sedna for bringing us safely to our current location; for abidingly serving as the vessel for our adventures; and for teaching us the high standard of sturdiness needed for small ocean-going vessels such as you. We will miss you terribly.

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And most of all, thank you Clay, for taking us greenhorns aboard and for teaching us about sailing, Yanmar engines, navigation, scrappiness, and maybe even how to love the sea. Thank you too for guiding us safely through the New England waters, and for all the many adventures we’ve enjoyed together. Best of luck in the rest of your journey, and we hope to see you again soon! Cheers Captain Clay!… or perhaps we should say, Captain Bootleg! Thanks again.

~ Natasha

P.S. To follow Natasha and Travis on the rest of their journey, please go to (and follow!) nsteinma.wordpress.com.

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